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WHO changes name of monkeypox to ‘mpox’

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Change is a way of standardizing the term in the world and avoiding ‘problematization’; entity was open to making new changes

REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

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Logo of the World Health Organization on the facade of the institution’s building in Geneva

THE World Health Organization (WHO) changed the name of monkey pox to ‘mpox’ as a way to standardize the term to refer to the disease in all languages. “The issue of using the new name in different languages ​​was widely discussed. The term ‘mpox’ may be used in other languages,” the WHO said, adding that both names will be used for one year until the term monkeypox is completely replaced, the WHO specified. The entity was open to change once again if the term is problematic in any language. If this occurs, WHO would initiate consultations with the competent authorities. When the monkeypox outbreak began in the spring of 2022, “racist and stigmatizing statements” were noted online, which led some countries and individuals to ask for a name change, WHO recalled. Monkeypox is so named because it was originally identified in monkeys assigned to research in Denmark in 1958, but the disease develops more commonly in rodents. It was first reported in humans in 1970, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and, until May of this year, its spread in humans was limited to certain countries in West Africa, where it is endemic. The disease causes rashes, which may appear on Organs genitals or mouth, accompanied by fever and sore throat. In most cases, the patients are, so far, relatively young men who have sex with men. This year, 81,107 cases were reported in 110 countries, with a total of 55 deaths, according to the WHO.

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Source: Jovempan

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