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    The pop albums of the week

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    Wallis Bird: Hands (Mount Silver/Virgin
    Wallis Bird sings “I’ll Never Hide My Love Away” on her seventh studio album “Hands” – almost as if it were a replica of the similarly titled Beatles song “You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away”. In addition to her strong statement of love for her wife, the Neukölln-based Irish woman (whose fans include U2 and Amanda Palmer) is also working on her own political awakening (from 9/11 to marriage for all) – and on her renunciation from the film break drug excess. In terms of sound, Wallis Bird moves between groovy, guitar-driven Shania Twain vocals and 80s-pop songs with melancholic synth pads and forward-rushing beats. Stefan Hochgesand, Tip Magazine

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    Liam GallagherC’mon You Know (Warner)
    After initially disoriented Post-Oasis years in the shadow of brother Noel, the younger Gallagher has built up a team that tailors rock-solid songs to his third solo album that sound like cover versions from the golden era of rock music. Main requirement: The songs must not disturb the beer fetch when Liam sings them live between the Oasis classics. Impressive, however, is the fervor with which he presents this CDU rock for nostalgic Oasis disciples. Torsten Groß, moderator


    Porridge Radio: Waterslide, Diving Board, Ladder to the Sky (Secretly Canadian)
    Just because you repeat something over and over again doesn’t make it any truer. Dana Margoline, singer of the Brighton band Porridge Radio, certainly knows that herself: on her third album she sings the sentence “I don’t want to be loved” 57 times, which of course is a lie. Unfortunately, not everything gets better through repetition and so the almost endlessly repetitive, almost howling scream-singing of Margolines can be quite annoying at times. That doesn’t make the album a flop. But while Porridge Radio did great songs with a scratchy, synth-heavy DIY sound on their celebrated predecessor, on “Waterslide” it’s more the quiet pieces that should be played louder. Jana Weiss, daily mirror


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    Wilco: Cruel Country: (dBpm Records/ADA)
    Wilco emerged from the rubble of alternative country pioneers Uncle Tupelo in the mid-’90s. After many lineup changes and numerous digressions into pop, heartland rock, folk, krautrock, electronic and psychedelia, they have now recorded a country (double) album. Is this a return to basics? It doesn’t sound like it. Because “Cruel Country” is not a rustic adaptation, but a virtuoso play with the forms and images of country music that deals critically with the country that once produced this music. Maik Bruggemeyer, Rolling Stone

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    Source: Tagesspiegel

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